Latest news on synthetic drugs - March 2018

March 2018 – New Zealand: Police issue warning about N-ethylpentylone sold as “ecstasy”

On 14th March 2018, the New Zealand Police issued a warning about N-ethylpentylone after Christchurch Hospital Emergency Department reported the admission of 13 people at the end of February, who had unintentionally used N-ethylpentylone which had been sold to them as “ecstasy”.

N-ethylpentylone, which is also known as ethylone, has been reported to the UNODC Early Warning Advisory by 28 countries from East Asia, Europe and North America. The majority of these countries identified the substance for the first time in 2016. The substance was first reported to UNODC in 2011.

 

For more information, please see:

New Zealand Police – “Police issue warning about N-Ethylpentylone”
http://www.police.govt.nz/news/release/police-issue-warning-about-n-ethylpentylone

 

March 2018 – UNODC: Twelve substances "scheduled" at the 61st Session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs

At its 61st regular session from 12 to 16 March 2018, the Commission on Narcotic Drugs decided to place twelve susbtances under international control. Following recommendations by the WHO Expert Committee on Drug Dependence, twelve substances were added to the relevant schedules of the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs of 1961 as amended by the 1972 Protocol and the Convention on Psychotropic Substances of 1971.Added to the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs of 1961, as amended by the 1972 Protocol

1.    Ocfentanil - Schedule I
2.    Furanylfentanyl (Fu-F) - Schedule I
3.    Acryloylfentanyl (Acrylfentanyl) - Schedule I
4.    4-fluoroisobutyrfentanyl (para-Fluoroisobutyrfentanyl, 4-FIBF, pFIBF) - Schedule I
5.    Tetrahydrofuranylfentanyl (THF-F) - Schedule I
6.    Carfentanil - Schedule I and Schedule IV

Added to the Convention on Psychotropic Substances of 1971

7.    4-fluoramphetamine (4-FA) - Schedule II
8.    AB-PINACA - Schedule II
9.    AB-CHMINACA - Schedule II
10.  5F-PB-22 - Schedule II
11.  UR-144 - Schedule II
12.  5F-MDMB-PINACA (5F-ADB) - Schedule II


For further information please see:

EWA news clip on substances recommended for scheduling by the WHO Expert Committee on Drug Dependence
https://www.unodc.org/LSS/Announcement/Details/545d1760-ddfa-427e-b7ad-3cf7e67e91d1

Detailed information on the thirty-eighth meeting, substance evaluation and previous committees of the WHO ECDD
http://www.who.int/medicines/access/controlled-substances/ecdd/en/

 

March 2018 – UNODC-SMART: Impact of NPS on the synthetic drug market is explored in the SMART Update 19

The Global SMART Update (Volume 19, March 2018) presents an analysis of the synthetic drug situation before and after the rapid emergence of large numbers of NPS. Particularly, this report aims to shed light on how NPS have produced a transformative shift in a market that was characterised by a limited number of substances to one that includes hundreds of substances of diverse chemistries. Despite their diversity, NPS can be grouped into the same six categories of psychoactive effects known from traditional drugs under international control.

 

For more information, please see:

Global SMART Update Volume 19 “Understanding the synthetic drug market: the NPS factor”
https://www.unodc.org/documents/scientific/Global_Smart_Update_2018_Vol.19.pdf

UNODC Report “Global Synthetic Drugs Assessment”
https://www.unodc.org/documents/scientific/Global_Synthetic_Drugs_Assessment_2017.pdf

 

March 2018 – INCB: Synthetic cathinones and synthetic cannabinoids account for the majority of incidents reported to IONICS

By November 2017, over almost a 3-year period, synthetic cathinones and synthetic cannabinoids accounted for the majority of incidents reported by Member States to the INCB Project Ion Incident Communication System (IONICS). IONICS provides national authorities with a platform to share information on incidents (such as suspicious shipments, trafficking and manufacture or production) involving NPS.

Incidents involving synthetic cathinones included substances such as methylone, mephedrone, 4-CMC, alpha-PVP3-MMC and NEB and involved synthetic cannabinoids such as 5F-AMB and 5F-APINACA. Since 2016, IONICS has also received reports of at least 25 incidents from three European countries involving five fentanyl analogues: acrylfentanyl, carfentanil, furanylfentanylbutyrfentanyl and para-fluorofentanyl.

 

Report of the International Narcotics Control Board for 2017
https://www.incb.org/documents/Publications/AnnualReports/AR2017/Annual_Report/E_INCB_AR_ebook.pdf

 

March 2018 – UNODC SMART: More than 800 NPS have been reported to UNODC from over 110 countries and territories from all regions of the world

NPS have become a global phenomenon with over 110 countries and territories from all regions of the world having reported one or more NPS. Up to December 2017, more than 800 substances have been reported to the UNODC Early Warning Advisory (EWA) on NPS by Governments, laboratories and partner organisations. Looking at the psychoactive effects of NPS that have been reported until December 2017, the majority are stimulants, followed by synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists and classic hallucinogens.



For more information, please see:

UNODC Leaflet on new psychoactive substances (2018)
https://www.unodc.org/LSS/Attachment/Download/39fbc807-03c0-4e24-a208-b9d3ba8695d9

UNODC Poster on new psychoactive substances by effect group (2018)
https://www.unodc.org/LSS/Attachment/Download/48f775d9-994d-4195-b2b8-25b34a3945ae